National Holidays + Social Media

Screen Shot 2018-01-14 at 6.08.48 PM.pngIn honor of Martin Luther King Day, I thought I would do a post on social media etiquette when it comes to “National Holidays.” This can be a touch and go subject and companies often either hit the nail on the head or miss the mark. I have a few do’s and don’ts to hopefully help you determine what (if anything) is the right to post on behalf of your company or brand on holidays.

 

Do’s:

  1. Quote

Everyone can appreciate a strong and meaningful quote. On those “touchy” holidays or sentimental remembrances, using someone else’s quote may be the best way to make your acknowledgement. Share something meaningful and something in line with your company’s missions and values. Always credit the speaker and never plagiarize. You can easily create a quote graphic on Canva in minutes that will be a nice way to accompany a shared quote.

  1. Re-Post

Look to companies you admire or respect or that are industry leaders and do not be afraid to re-post their message. Two rules of thumb for this: only re- share if the message is in line with your brand and values and always (cannot stress this enough) give credit where credit is due. This is a great option if you are not quite sure what to say, but know you need to say something!

  1. Be Tasteful

Being tasteful should be “do” for any post, but especially in these situations. Often times holidays have deep and sentimental connotations that your audience will be emotionally tied to. Bear that in mind and ensure you are only sharing something that can be viewed in a positive light. I recently heard an advertisement for an appliance sale on Martin Luther King Day. Now, I know many companies use this as a sale period, but the way it was portrayed was very tasteless and flippant. That is an example of NOT being tasteful.

 

Don’ts:

  1. Don’t force it

What I mean by “force” is do not desperately attempt to create a connection between a holiday, anniversary, or event and your company that just does not exist. Depending on the industry of a business, there are going to be dates that are just completely irrelevant to a holiday or there is no correlation. Use your discretion here, but my advice is to analyze the occasion and see if anything immediately about your brand correlates to it. If you are struggling to come up with something, maybe just skip it! No one is going to fault you for this, if anything they will fault you for creating a nonexistent connection.

 

  1. Don’t over do it

With that being said, follow the “do’s” for your message. Being tasteful, true to your brand, and inclusive is the best way to successfully pull off one of these messages. One simple post is usually enough acknowledging the date and perhaps the meaning of it. A short, concise caption with a nice photograph will effectively communicate what you need to say. Look to other similar businesses or brands you admire and use their message as inspiration or guidance. Obviously, put your personal and creative touch on it.

 

I hope these guidelines are helpful for you and your company when constructing your holiday correspondences. Share examples of times you think your company (or another) has done something really well or a total FAIL in the comments below!

 

As always, email me with any questions. Follow along on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn for more!

In honor of Martin Luther King Day, I thought I would do a post on social media etiquette when it comes to “National Holidays.” This can be a touch and go subject and companies often either hit the nail on the head or miss the mark. I have a few do’s and don’ts to hopefully help you determine what (if anything) is the right to post on behalf of your company or brand on holidays.

 

Do’s:

  1. Quote

Everyone can appreciate a strong and meaningful quote. On those “touchy” holidays or sentimental remembrances, using someone else’s quote may be the best way to make your acknowledgement. Share something meaningful and something in line with your company’s missions and values. Always credit the speaker and never plagiarize. You can easily create a quote graphic on Canva in minutes that will be a nice way to accompany a shared quote.

  1. Re-Post

Look to companies you admire or respect or that are industry leaders and do not be afraid to re-post their message. Two rules of thumb for this: only re- share if the message is in line with your brand and values and always (cannot stress this enough) give credit where credit is due. This is a great option if you are not quite sure what to say, but know you need to say something!

  1. Be Tasteful

Being tasteful should be “do” for any post, but especially in these situations. Often times holidays have deep and sentimental connotations that your audience will be emotionally tied to. Bear that in mind and ensure you are only sharing something that can be viewed in a positive light. I recently heard an advertisement for an appliance sale on Martin Luther King Day. Now, I know many companies use this as a sale period, but the way it was portrayed was very tasteless and flippant. That is an example of NOT being tasteful.

 

Don’ts:

  1. Don’t force it

What I mean by “force” is do not desperately attempt to create a connection between a holiday, anniversary, or event and your company that just does not exist. Depending on the industry of a business, there are going to be dates that are just completely irrelevant to a holiday or there is no correlation. Use your discretion here, but my advice is to analyze the occasion and see if anything immediately about your brand correlates to it. If you are struggling to come up with something, maybe just skip it! No one is going to fault you for this, if anything they will fault you for creating a nonexistent connection.

 

  1. Don’t over do it

With that being said, follow the “do’s” for your message. Being tasteful, true to your brand, and inclusive is the best way to successfully pull off one of these messages. One simple post is usually enough acknowledging the date and perhaps the meaning of it. A short, concise caption with a nice photograph will effectively communicate what you need to say. Look to other similar businesses or brands you admire and use their message as inspiration or guidance. Obviously, put your personal and creative touch on it.

 

I hope these guidelines are helpful for you and your company when constructing your holiday correspondences. Share examples of times you think your company (or another) has done something really well or a total FAIL in the comments below!

 

As always, email me with any questions. Follow along on Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn for more!

 

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